Microsoft kills standalone Windows storage server

Our weekly roundup of storage blogs finds evidence that Microsoft is walking away from the standalone version of Windows-as-NAS, while HP has shot one of its own arrays to prove that it works.

Microsoft’s Windows Storage Server has never really been a big player. Indeed, the company has only just released the 2008 version (Remember, folks, its May 2009!) Now the company seems to be walking away from a standalone version of Windows Storage Server, according to Steven Foskett who today writes that

“This will be the last release of Windows Storage Server. There won’t even be a special Storage Server version of Server 2008 Service Pack 2! Starting now, Storage Server is just an optional feature of Windows Server. Purchasing and production use will still be limited to storage OEMs, but Microsoft has finally reconciled Storage Server with the rest of the Windows Server world.”

The blog for the product has no confirmation of the news, but Foskett is a reliable source and a Microsoft MVP to boot, so we think this one is accurate. He’s also got a wealth of detail about the new 2008 version of the server.

Elsewhere in storage blogland, EMC is up to its usual tricks as Chuck Hollis slags off another competitor, in this case Oracle.

Of course, Oracle is not really a competitor yet, seeing as no-one knows what Larry plans to do with Sun’s storage line. But that hasn’t stopped Chuck niggling about Oracle’s attitude to VMware. It’s so nice to see big brother EMC fight little sister VMware’s battles, isn’t it. Either that or the dog is wagging the tail! Or vice versa. Or whatever.

EMC-aligned blogger Storage Anarchist is also at it, disrespecting IBM’s SSD play. Another vendor plugging like mad is Seagate, which to our trained eye seems to be trying to shunt its customers in the direction of high-margin products.

There’s still a bit of speculation around about Sun/Oracle, like this piece from HDS’ Klaus Mikkelsen.

This week’s amazingly inappropriate video comes from HP, which for reasons we cannot really understand has shot one of its arrays (with a gun) to prove it works. If, that is, you shoot the bits that don’t really matter. The best part of the video is the disclaimers, which state, in part, that “HP does not endorse or recommend that you perform a similar test”.

And there we were thinking that from now on, HP owners would keep a shotgun handy and try that instead of CTRL-ALT-DELETE.

This thing we find so odd about these vids is that we cannot imagine a single storage buyer who will believe the punchline - HP storage is bulletproof. Or do vendors really underestimate us all?

We found the video in an otherwise innocuous post in which HP and Hitachi share some love.

While we’re on media, check this out: a storage comic, of sorts. It even comes from Australia. Over at Storage Switzerland, they’ve placed Fiber Channel drives on death watch. Backup Blog contends some Data Domain claims about dedupe.

Microsoft’s Windows Storage Server has never really been a big player. Indeed, the company has only just released the 2008 version (Remember, folks, its May 2009!) Now the company seems to be walking away from a standalone version of Windows Storage Server, according to Steven Foskett who today writes that

“This will be the last release of Windows Storage Server. There won’t even be a special Storage Server version of Server 2008 Service Pack 2! Starting now, Storage Server is just an optional feature of Windows Server. Purchasing and production use will still be limited to storage OEMs, but Microsoft has finally reconciled Storage Server with the rest of the Windows Server world.”

The blog for the product has no confirmation of the news, but Foskett is a reliable source and a Microsoft MVP to boot, so we think this one is accurate. He’s also got a wealth of detail about the new 2008 version of the server.

Elsewhere in storage blogland, EMC is up to its usual tricks as Chuck Hollis slags off another competitor, in this case Oracle.

Of course, Oracle is not really a competitor yet, seeing as no-one knows what Larry plans to do with Sun’s storage line. But that hasn’t stopped Chuck niggling about Oracle’s attitude to VMware. It’s so nice to see big brother EMC fight little sister VMware’s battles, isn’t it. Either that or the dog is wagging the tail! Or vice versa. Or whatever.

EMC-aligned blogger Storage Anarchist is also at it, disrespecting IBM’s SSD play. Another vendor plugging like mad is Seagate, which to our trained eye seems to be trying to shunt its customers in the direction of high-margin products.

There’s still a bit of speculation around about Sun/Oracle, like this piece from HDS’ Klaus Mikkelsen.

This week’s amazingly inappropriate video comes from HP, which for reasons we cannot really understand has shot one of its arrays (with a gun) to prove it works. If, that is, you shoot the bits that don’t really matter. The best part of the video is the disclaimers, which state, in part, that “HP does not endorse or recommend that you perform a similar test”.

And there we were thinking that from now on, HP owners would keep a shotgun handy and try that instead of CTRL-ALT-DELETE.

This thing we find so odd about these vids is that we cannot imagine a single storage buyer who will believe the punchline - HP storage is bulletproof. Or do vendors really underestimate us all?

We found the video in an otherwise innocuous post in which HP and Hitachi share some love.

While we’re on media, check this out: a storage comic, of sorts. It even comes from Australia. Over at Storage Switzerland, they’ve placed Fiber Channel drives on death watch. Backup Blog contends some Data Domain claims about dedupe.

Virtual Geek has been to play with Cisco’s new unified computing kit and likes the storage bits.

And lastly, this is a bit off-piste, but how often do you hear someone say “people who work with mainframes are more fun than people who work in a distributed environment”? In this video you’ll hear just that. And you’ll also see how lame a company can become when it tries to be cool.

Microsoft’s Windows Storage Server has never really been a big player. Indeed, the company has only just released the 2008 version (Remember, folks, its May 2009!) Now the company seems to be walking away from a standalone version of Windows Storage Server, according to Steven Foskett who today writes that

“This will be the last release of Windows Storage Server. There won’t even be a special Storage Server version of Server 2008 Service Pack 2! Starting now, Storage Server is just an optional feature of Windows Server. Purchasing and production use will still be limited to storage OEMs, but Microsoft has finally reconciled Storage Server with the rest of the Windows Server world.”

The blog for the product has no confirmation of the news, but Foskett is a reliable source and a Microsoft MVP to boot, so we think this one is accurate. He’s also got a wealth of detail about the new 2008 version of the server.

Elsewhere in storage blogland, EMC is up to its usual tricks as Chuck Hollis slags off another competitor, in this case Oracle.

Of course, Oracle is not really a competitor yet, seeing as no-one knows what Larry plans to do with Sun’s storage line. But that hasn’t stopped Chuck niggling about Oracle’s attitude to VMware. It’s so nice to see big brother EMC fight little sister VMware’s battles, isn’t it. Either that or the dog is wagging the tail! Or vice versa. Or whatever.

EMC-aligned blogger Storage Anarchist is also at it, disrespecting IBM’s SSD play. Another vendor plugging like mad is Seagate, which to our trained eye seems to be trying to shunt its customers in the direction of high-margin products.

There’s still a bit of speculation around about Sun/Oracle, like this piece from HDS’ Klaus Mikkelsen.

This week’s amazingly inappropriate video comes from HP, which for reasons we cannot really understand has shot one of its arrays (with a gun) to prove it works. If, that is, you shoot the bits that don’t really matter. The best part of the video is the disclaimers, which state, in part, that “HP does not endorse or recommend that you perform a similar test”.

And there we were thinking that from now on, HP owners would keep a shotgun handy and try that instead of CTRL-ALT-DELETE.

This thing we find so odd about these vids is that we cannot imagine a single storage buyer who will believe the punchline - HP storage is bulletproof. Or do vendors really underestimate us all?

We found the video in an otherwise innocuous post in which HP and Hitachi share some love.

While we’re on media, check this out: a storage comic, of sorts. It even comes from Australia. Over at Storage Switzerland, they’ve placed Fiber Channel drives on death watch. Backup Blog contends some Data Domain claims about dedupe.

Virtual Geek has been to play with Cisco’s new unified computing kit and likes the storage bits.

And lastly, this is a bit off-piste, but how often do you hear someone say “people who work with mainframes are more fun than people who work in a distributed environment”? In this video you’ll hear just that. And you’ll also see how lame a company can become when it tries to be cool.

Virtual Geek has been to play with Cisco’s new unified computing kit and likes the storage bits.

And lastly, this is a bit off-piste, but how often do you hear someone say “people who work with mainframes are more fun than people who work in a distributed environment”? In this video you’ll hear just that. And you’ll also see how lame a company can become when it tries to be cool.

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